Vol 'n' tell

The Official Blog of Volunteer Richmond Information Services
  • Non-Profit Video Picks: April 2016

    Let's start off the new year with a dose of global awareness. Volunteer blogger Ray Wang has curated three stories that take us around the world to learn about inequal access to healthcare, water, and information, and the organizations that are doing something about it. 


    What is World Polio Day?



    According to the World Health Organization, polio, which is short for poliomyelitis, is an infectious viral disease that mostly affects young children under the age of five.


    1 in 200 infections leads to irreversible paralysis. Among those paralyzed, 5% to 10% die when their breathing muscles become paralyzed. 

    Together, Rotary and UNICEF have launched a campaign to end polio forever with their “End Polio Now: Make History Today”. Learn more about their ambitious goals to immunize their world's children here.



    Why Water



    Water is everything. Actually, that’s not quite right. I mean clean water is everything. It’s what keeps us hydrated, healthy, and most importantly, alive. 

    Can you imagine living a day without access to clean water? I certainly can’t – but it’s a reality for 663 million people across the world. Millions of people drink dirty and disease-infested water because clean water simply isn’t accessible.

    Diseases from dirty water kill more people every year than all forms of violence, including war. Help bring clean water to those who need it by visiting Charity:Water and learning more about the work they do around the world.



    Mobile Phones: The Farmers' New Tool


     

    Mobile phones are handy tools for taking selfies and looking at cat photos. They also have the potential to transform agriculture in Sub-Saharan Africa by providing farmers with access to information. 

    Currently, African farmers have a much lower crop yield than farmers in other continents because African farmers lack training on what to plant, how to plant, and how to keep soil fertile. 

    Mobile phones could potentially help African farmers learn about seeds, fertilizers, and techniques such as crop rotation. They can help farmers stay up-to-date with weather reports and market prices. Mobile phones have the potential to increase productivity and farmer earnings, and ultimately change agriculture in Africa.


    According to Forbes, only 24% of U.S. IT professionals are female. This alarming low number of females in the IT industry limits the potential growth of the technology industry. According to Intel vice president Bernadette Andrietti, “Women offer a fresh perspective on pro


    According to com/sites/leoking/2014/03/08/women-in-technology-a-brightening-outlook/" data-mce-href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/leoking/2014/03/08/women-in-technology-a-brightening-outlook/" style="color: #1b8be0; font-style: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: 1.7;">Forbes, only 24% of U.S. IT professionals are female. This alarming low number of females in the IT industry limits the potential growth of the technology industry. According to Intel vice president Bernadette Andrietti, “Women offer a fresh perspective on product design, ways of working, risk-taking and many other aspects of business.”


    To inspire more females to enter the technology industry, established female engineers such as Kelly Ellis, Software Engineer at Google, and Shannon Spanhake, Deputy Innovation Officer for the City of San Francisco, share their motivation for entering the technology industry. They also share their thoughts on possible social solutions and products that can be developed if women are encouraged to pursue careers in technology.

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  • Resilient Kids

    On its "Who is Chimo?" page, Chimo Community Services describes its work as "preventing tragedies and saving lives". One of the ways in which it carries out this important work is through the Resilient Kids program, which provides support to children in families that are living with mental illness or additions. Our volunteer blogger Amanda Oye interviewed Daniel Remedios at Chimo to find out more.




    Not all kids get to grow up carefree. For the ones who have a parent who is dealing with mental illness or addiction, understanding and expressing how they are being affected can be a struggle. 


    “Some of them are forced to grow up a lot sooner than they have to and that can definitely take a toll,” said Daniel Remedios, who is a group leader at Resilient Kids, a program that is designed to help children understand and talk about how having a parent with mental illness or addiction impacts their lives.


    “It’s tough when you know that there is something going on with your parents but you can’t express it,” said Daniel. “It’s also tough when you don’t have the right vocabulary for it.” 


    The goal of Resilient Kids is to help give children the tools that they need to express what they are feeling. “We focus on them learning and understanding their feelings,” Daniel said. The next step is “giving them some techniques to deal with it.”


    One of the ways they do this is through games and activities. In one of the games they regularly play, the kids are shown picture cards that convey different emotions. 


    "[The kids are asked to] say what the person in the picture is feeling and we talk about what that is,” Daniel said. In another activity, “we trace their whole bodies on a big sheet of paper and get them to write down where they feel stuff,” he said. 


    This activity has proved to be particularly useful in the case of one of the younger kids who had been sent there by a teacher because he was hitting people and no one could figure out why.

    When the group leaders asked him to write on the paper outline of his body, they discovered that “he feels anxious in his hands, so every time he felt anxious he felt this red ball of energy in his hands and he would have to release it by hitting someone,” Daniel said. This discovery allowed them to more effectively address the problems he was having at school.


    The program is designed to give kids as much individual attention as possible because not all of the kids are experiencing the same things. There is at least one adult for every two kids “so you can focus more on individual kids,” Daniel said. There are clinical youth councillors who group the kids based on their emotional maturity and emotional intelligence.


    There are 6-9 kids ages 6-11 who participate in the program at any given time. The program runs three times per year for either to ten weeks, with sessions of about four hours per week.

    It runs as part of Supporting Families, a collaborative initiative between 10 community organizations from around Richmond. Member organizations include: Ministry of Children and Family Development, Vancouver Coastal Health (Richmond), Canadian Mental Health Association, Richmond Addiction Services Society, Chimo Community Services, BC Schizophrenia Society, Richmond School District #38, Richmond Public Library, Family Services of Greater Vancouver, and Touchstone Family Association.


    Supporting Families was established because “we found that, in Richmond, we all work for community services but we were helping different people in the family without knowing about it,” said Daniel. “There was overlapping information, and it wasn’t efficient because we couldn’t share information, so we decided to come together,” he said. 


    Coming together has mean that at the same time as Resilient Kids takes place, Supporting Families can run a parent support group. There is also a Family Fun night once each month where all of the different families participating in the program get together and cook a meal and have the opportunity to relax and have fun with other people who are in similar situations.


    Referrals to the program can come from any where including parents, other family members, teachers and health care professionals. For children over the age of 11 there is Resilient Youth. This program has two age groups: 11-13 and 14-18. For more information, please visit the Supporting Families website at: http://supportingfamilies.ca.


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  • The 2016 Census: Join the Team!



    As you can tell from the image above, Richmond Cares, Richmond Gives is a proud supporter of Canada's 2016 Census. Census data helps us better understand our country and our community. It allows us to study the past and plan for the future. So clearly, gathering that data is an important process. And you can help! Statistics Canada is hiring 35,000 employees to assist with the 2016 Census, and at RCRG, we're doing our part to spread the word. Read below for details on how to apply!

    Looking to make a lasting contribution to Canada, its communities and its people?

    Canada’s next census will take place in May 2016 and Statistics Canada is hiring approximately 35,000 employees across the country to work on the collection phase of the 2016 Census.

    Staff are required for a variety of supervisory and non-supervisory positions between March and the end of July 2016. These non-office jobs will involve working in neighbourhoods and communities across all urban, rural and remote areas of the country.


    Approximately 5,000 Crew Leaders and assistants will be hired to train, lead and supervise a team of Enumerators, while an estimated 30,000 Enumerators will be hired to distribute census questionnaires, conduct in-person interviews and follow-up with respondents in person and by phone.

    The rates of pay range from $16.31 to $19.91 an hour, plus authorized expenses. Screening of applications will begin in mid-February.

    Applicants must be:

    - 18 years of age or older prior to start of duties

    - a Canadian citizen or otherwise eligible to work in Canada

    - able to commit to at least 20 hours per week, including days, evenings, weekends and holidays, as required.

    If you’re interested in working directly in the community, meeting new people or earning supplementary income, then this kind of work is right for you! Apply online at www.census.gc.ca/jobs.

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  • Making Christmas Dreams Come True

    Poverty is an enormous issue that the Christmas Fund grapples with every year. We are only able to help low-income families during the holiday season thanks to the generosity of our friends in the community. In 2015, our circle of friends grew by leaps and bounds thanks to the hard work from the founders of the Dream Project. We couldn't thank them enough for bringing their incredible vision to life. We asked volunteer blogger Amanda Oye to find out more about the Dream Project and their plans for 2016.





    This past Christmas season, a group of local entrepreneurs came together with a common dream: to inspire people to get involved in their community and to donate to the Richmond Christmas Fund, a cause that helps make Christmas dreams come true.

    “Everyone has a dream” said Richard Vetter of Wealthsmart


    Vetter, who was invited onto the Christmas Fund Roundtable in 2014, is one member of the collaborative team of entrepreneurs who started the Dream Project this past holiday season. 


    He, along with Bryan Johnstone, of Riverside Mortgage Group, Brett Kendrick, of Nurses Next Door, David Newman, of Signarama and George Pytlik, of Adwiz Communications, started the Dream Project because they wanted to put forward a broad challenge for entrepreneurs to get involved in giving back to the community. 


    “It’s really just a collaboration between entrepreneurs and business owners who just want to change the world in one way or another,” said Vetter. 


    “It was inspired by all of the people working on the Christmas Fund.”


    To encourage and inspire people to give, those who donated $500 or more to the Dream Project received a photo with a Christmas Fund representative and a large cheque, and a short video of a representative from their organization answering the question: “What is your dream?” 


    “We wanted to give people something tangible … something that can inspire others in their giving,” Vetter said. 


    The photo was a way for those who already gave to encourage others to do the same and the video was a way to help entrepreneurs tell their stories. They wanted people to see organizations having a stake in the community, while also demonstrating their commitment to the community.


    The project has humble beginnings, having fallen short of their ambitious $20,000 goal in 2015, but they are aiming to give it their all again in 2016. 


    “We would love to challenge entrepreneurs in 2016 to really benefit from all of the fruits of giving,” said Vetter. 


    There were seven major donations in 2015, and many smaller ones as well. The Dream Project team met a lot of challenges in their first year, but the team built a strong infrastructure for the Project, which will remain in place for years to come. 


    Despite the fact that they fell short this past holiday season, the group is still planning on reaching their $20,000 goal this year.


    For more information about the Dream Project you can visit their website: www.dreamproject.ca 





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  • Caring Company profile: TuGo Insurance

    One of the best things about working at a volunteer centre is when you get a call from a company asking how they can help their community. When TuGo Insurance called to ask how they could get involved, we connected them with some local volunteer opportunities. They got right to work, and it looks like they had a blast! Learn about their volunteer adventures in this guest post from Daisy


    Last October, we welcomed Employee Volunteer Week (EVW); a new event that’s part of TuGo’s Social Responsibility Initiative and the newest addition to TuGo’s Employee Volunteer Program. In the days leading up to the Thanksgiving long weekend, TuGo employees participated in five opportunities to give back to the community and dedicated time to important causes.


    Here’s how we stepped out of our work shoes, rolled up our sleeves and volunteered to pitch in at some local parks and charities! Take a look at the pictures below to see the fun we had helping our local communities while enjoying the beauty and generosity of our cities!


    TuGo head office employees in Richmond, BC choose from three volunteer options: cleaning up garbage at Terra Nova Rural Park, Garry Point Park or helping at The Richmond Food Bank. 


    Garry Point Park


    Despite the typical fall rain in Richmond, BC, TuGo employees volunteered with smiles on their faces right before Thanksgiving weekend.


    Garry Point Park is a 75 acres waterfront park in Richmond, BC, near Steveston’s historic fishing village at the mouth of the Fraser River. It’s a great place to take your dog for a walk, fly a kite, eat delicious fish and chips, or watch a beautiful sunset! 


    Garry Point Park includes a Japanese memorial garden and sandy beaches along the South Arm of the Fraser River. This park is one of Richmond’s largest and the only one with a beach. TuGo employee volunteers did our part to keep it clean.

    TuGo employees volunteering at rainy Garry Point Park
    Even in the rain, TuGo employees were still ready to clean up Garry Point Park!
    TuGo employees volunteer at Garry Point Park.
    Here’s Lesley, our Customer Operations Director and Sherlyn, Senior Support Specialist striking a quick pose.
    TuGo employee volunteers use teamwork to reach garbage at Garry Point Park
    Two hands are better than one when getting garbage from tricky places! Now that’s TuGo teamwork!

    Terra Nova Rural Park


    Richmond’s Terra Nova Rural Park is 63 acres with historic buildings, a community garden, picnic areas, and a pretty cool Play Environment. The park is right along the Fraser river dyke and habitats for birds and other wildlife. The Sharing Farm and Terra Nova School Yard Society also make this park special, and TuGo volunteers were happy to help keep this park as clean as it is beautiful.

    TuGo Richmond volunteers picking up garbage near YVR.
    TuGo employees, Iain, HR Director, and Rajbir from IT showing off the garbage they collected at Terra Nova Park, just south of YVR.
    TuGo volunteers cleanup beautiful Terra Nova Park.
    Here’s the Terra Nova Park afternoon cleanup team heading into the park.
    TuGo employees cleaning up the playground at Terra Nova Park.
    Not only did we pick up garbage in Terra Nova Park, we got to know our colleagues better too! Who knew volunteering with co-workers could be so great for morale!

    Richmond Food Bank


    The Richmond Food Bank provides healthy and nutritious food to more than 1,500 locals a week. They provide residents with healthy food choices and connect them to services that address the root causes of poverty. The Richmond Food Bank runs solely on the generosity of volunteers and donations. With Thanksgiving just around the corner it made volunteering at the food bank all the more meaningful.

    Richmond TuGo employees volunteering at Richmond Food Bank.



    See the original post from Tugo here.



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  • Non-Profit Video Picks: January 2016

    Let's start off the new year with a dose of global awareness. Volunteer blogger Ray Wang has curated three stories that take us around the world to learn about inequal access to healthcare, water, and information, and the organizations that are doing something about it. 


    What is World Polio Day?



    According to the World Health Organization, polio, which is short for poliomyelitis, is an infectious viral disease that mostly affects young children under the age of five.


    1 in 200 infections leads to irreversible paralysis. Among those paralyzed, 5% to 10% die when their breathing muscles become paralyzed. 

    Together, Rotary and UNICEF have launched a campaign to end polio forever with their “End Polio Now: Make History Today”. Learn more about their ambitious goals to immunize their world's children here.



    Why Water



    Water is everything. Actually, that’s not quite right. I mean clean water is everything. It’s what keeps us hydrated, healthy, and most importantly, alive. 

    Can you imagine living a day without access to clean water? I certainly can’t – but it’s a reality for 663 million people across the world. Millions of people drink dirty and disease-infested water because clean water simply isn’t accessible.

    Diseases from dirty water kill more people every year than all forms of violence, including war. Help bring clean water to those who need it by visiting Charity:Water and learning more about the work they do around the world.



    Mobile Phones: The Farmers' New Tool


     

    Mobile phones are handy tools for taking selfies and looking at cat photos. They also have the potential to transform agriculture in Sub-Saharan Africa by providing farmers with access to information. 

    Currently, African farmers have a much lower crop yield than farmers in other continents because African farmers lack training on what to plant, how to plant, and how to keep soil fertile. 

    Mobile phones could potentially help African farmers learn about seeds, fertilizers, and techniques such as crop rotation. They can help farmers stay up-to-date with weather reports and market prices. Mobile phones have the potential to increase productivity and farmer earnings, and ultimately change agriculture in Africa.


    According to Forbes, only 24% of U.S. IT professionals are female. This alarming low number of females in the IT industry limits the potential growth of the technology industry. According to Intel vice president Bernadette Andrietti, “Women offer a fresh perspective on pro


    According to com/sites/leoking/2014/03/08/women-in-technology-a-brightening-outlook/" data-mce-href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/leoking/2014/03/08/women-in-technology-a-brightening-outlook/" style="color: #1b8be0; font-style: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: 1.7;">Forbes, only 24% of U.S. IT professionals are female. This alarming low number of females in the IT industry limits the potential growth of the technology industry. According to Intel vice president Bernadette Andrietti, “Women offer a fresh perspective on product design, ways of working, risk-taking and many other aspects of business.”


    To inspire more females to enter the technology industry, established female engineers such as Kelly Ellis, Software Engineer at Google, and Shannon Spanhake, Deputy Innovation Officer for the City of San Francisco, share their motivation for entering the technology industry. They also share their thoughts on possible social solutions and products that can be developed if women are encouraged to pursue careers in technology.

    gg


    ff

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  • From Grandmother to Grandmother

    Social isolation is a major problem in modern cities. Communities need to feel connected in order to thrive. The Grandmother's Support Group at the Richmond Women's Resource Centre strengthens community one connection at a time by celebrating the power of peer groups for older women. Here to tell us more is volunteer blogger Amanda Oye.



    If home is where the heart is, and the heart is where your family is, where do you go when your family lives thousands of miles away? If you are lucky, you have a place like the Richmond Women’s Resource Centre’s Grandmother’s Support Group to turn to.


    “This group gives us an opportunity to meet new friends and get great information about community services. Even though we might not be able to use these services ourselves, we can pass the information along to others who can,” said Jennifer Xiao, one of the group’s members.


    There are currently more than 15 regular members, many of whom are immigrants. Meetings are conducted in Mandarin, and provide an opportunity to make new friends, share experiences, and discuss any issues or concerns that may come up in the members’ lives. 


    “It’s a really supportive group,” said the facilitator, Patricia Wang. “I can feel that in their hearts this group is very important to them.”


    All of the members of the Grandmother’s Support Group face a number of barriers in their daily lives, which can include those related to language, citizenship and living far away from their families and hometowns. The group meetings give them a place where they feel supported, and where they can learn about the resources available to them.


    Every meeting is different, but each typically starts with everyone chatting and catching up with fellow members, after which they sit down for tea and snacks. Language is the main barrier group members face, according to Wang, so they often spend time practicing their English, as well as sharing recipes, talking about their experiences and listening to presentations by guest speakers.


    The members are not the only ones who benefit immensely from the group. Wang is an immigrant from China, where her parents still live, so she counts on the group for support as much as they count on her. 


    “I feel like everyone is my mother,” she said. “In my heart, I have so much love for them.”


    The group meets twice each month from 9:30 am – 11:30 am. Anyone who is interested in joining can attend their first meeting for free, after which they need to sign up for a membership with the Women’s Resource Centre.



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  • The Power of Richmond Youth

    Richmond is a place where youth are making their mark, and the newly-formed Richmond Schools Youth Volunteer Association (RSYVA) is proof. We're delighted to let volunteer blogger Amanda Oye introduce you to some of RSYVA's directors - Beini Yin and Marco Yip. 



    RSYVA at the Richmond Leadership Showcase at Aberdeen 


    There is no need to lament the apathy of youth today – the members of the Richmond Schools Youth Volunteer Association (RSYVA) have already shattered that illusion. 


    RSYVA is what you get when you combine four volunteer clubs from across the Richmond School District that want to get more high school students excited about volunteering. 


    Their biggest selling point? Volunteering is actually really fun.


    “There’s no bad thing about volunteering,” said Marco Yip, a grade 12 student from Richmond Secondary. 


    In 2013, Marco got together with a few other like-minded students to create RSYVA. The association’s first members were Richmond Secondary’s Colts That Care, Steveston-London Secondary’s Jaws With a Cause, and Palmer Secondary’s Griffins That Give. 


    Burnett’s Breakers That Believe joined soon after when RSYVA began to reach out to other schools in the district to see if they were interested in starting volunteer clubs and joining the association.


    There is no president of this entirely student-run organization. 


    “We work more collaboratively,” said Marco. Beini, another RSYVA member, said that making the decision to operate without a president was very natural. 


    “Because we are all presidents of [the] clubs at our schools, it just felt natural to work as a group of presidents rather than having one main person,” she said. 


    Beini, a grade 12 student at Burnett Secondary, sees volunteering as a rewarding and fun experience. She was in grade 10 when Marco approached her to get a volunteer club going at her school. 


    She jumped at the chance because she “wanted to bring Burnett students a new perspective,” she said. She saw her classmates volunteering within her school and sometimes at Thompson Community Center, but not really stepping outside to other organizations in the city. 


    Her classmates have also been prone to viewing volunteering as a tedious task since they are required to volunteer to graduate, making it “more of a pressure than an encouragement,” Beini said.


    The members of the club she started, Breakers That Believe, have volunteered for a range of local causes including the Richmond Christmas Fund, the Richmond Food Bank, and the Salmon Festival.


    While the clubs all pursue their own volunteering initiatives, being a part of RSYVA gives them the opportunity to work collaboratively on bigger projects to get more high school students volunteering not only because they have to, but because they want to. 


    The annual RSYVA Volunteer Fair at Richmond Secondary School


    Two major projects they have organized have been an annual Volunteer Fair and a Youth Leadership Challenge, which Marco described as being like the Amazing Race, but with challenges to get youth thinking outside of the box.


    Marco and Beini are both graduating at the end of the school year, but still have high hopes for the future of RSYVA. 


    “Our goal is to have every single school have a volunteer club,” Marco said. 


    As someone who has been volunteering since he was in elementary school, Marco is well aware of all of the benefits that volunteering can have. His experiences as a volunteer have helped him build a lot of skills including leadership and management skills, which will benefit him moving forward. He has also had plenty of opportunities to meet new people and learn new things. 


    “I have a more open mind now,” he said. He wants others to see the benefits of volunteering as well, and to get involved. “Do it because of all of the positives, from building your resume to building leadership skills, and meeting new people … it is all beneficial,” he said.


    For more information about RSYVA, you can visit their Twitter (@rsyva2013) and Facebook pages.



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  • Ava's Christmas Fund Angels

    We received such a wonderful email from Sally Koldenhof last week that we decided to make her a guest blogger. Sally introduced us to one of the Richmond Christmas Fund's youngest supporters - her daughter Ava Koldenhof, who makes and sells beaded angels in support of low-income families in Richmond. Read on to learn more about Ava's work, and be sure to visit her webiste: Ava's Angels.



    I'm writing this on behalf of my 9 yr old daughter. For about a year, Ava, has been making beaded angels charms and selling them to earn money for charities.


    She started out by selling a handful to some friends and it has now turned into her taking orders from people, with one order requiring her to make 150 of them and shipping them to Ontario.


    She has always been a generous child and she quite often donates her birthday money to various charities.


    We have decided to make a website showcasing her beaded angel charms, but we want to make it clear to everyone that this is to help out a few of her favourite charities, the Richmond Christmas Fund being one of them.


    Our question - we were wondering if we could have permission to include a link on her "Ava's Angel's" website to the Richmond Christmas Fund? We want everyone to know where their money will be going when they purchase the angels.


    She has 4 charities the she has donated to before and would like to continue supporting by collecting up the money she earns from her sales and periodically donating to one of the charities that she will list on her site.


    Is this possible? It wouldn't be large amounts of money by any means but we are very proud of her and want to help encourage her generous spirit



    Thank you for your time,

    Sally (& Ava) Koldenhof



    See more of Ava's angel designs at: http://avasangels.wix.com/avasangels




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  • Non-Profit Video Picks: September 2015

    In this month's Non-Profit Video Picks, blogger Ray Wang gives you two sides of the story: that of the generous and benevolent donor, and that of the lucky beneficiaries. It doesn't get any shorter or sweeter than this - just two stories about those that help, and those that are grateful for the good in the world. 


    In Case You Missed It: LeBron James Will Pay 1,100 Students’ College Tuitions



    The 2 time NBA champion is makes an impact on and off the court. In mid-August, LeBron James announced that through the LeBron James Family Foundation, he’ll help pay for 1,100 students to go to college. The total amount for this sponsorship is approximately $41.8 million. Way to go, LeBron Bron! #kingjames #tryingtomakeadifference 



    Celebrating 30 Years of Camp Goodtimes




    Camp Goodtimes is a pediatric oncology camp that provides a safety-focused, medically supervised, and fun experience for children with cancer and their families. This year marks their 30 year anniversary and the organization celebrated by committing to further ensure youth in BC and Yukon don't have to face cancer alone. Like many non-profit organizations, Camp Goodtimes is looking for helpful and energetic volunteers. If you’re interested in contributing to Camp Goodtimes’ cause, visit their volunteer page.




    According to Forbes, only 24% of U.S. IT professionals are female. This alarming low number of females in the IT industry limits the potential growth of the technology industry. According to Intel vice president Bernadette Andrietti, “Women offer a fresh perspective on pro


    According to com/sites/leoking/2014/03/08/women-in-technology-a-brightening-outlook/" data-mce-href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/leoking/2014/03/08/women-in-technology-a-brightening-outlook/" style="color: #1b8be0; font-style: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: 1.7;">Forbes, only 24% of U.S. IT professionals are female. This alarming low number of females in the IT industry limits the potential growth of the technology industry. According to Intel vice president Bernadette Andrietti, “Women offer a fresh perspective on product design, ways of working, risk-taking and many other aspects of business.”


    To inspire more females to enter the technology industry, established female engineers such as Kelly Ellis, Software Engineer at Google, and Shannon Spanhake, Deputy Innovation Officer for the City of San Francisco, share their motivation for entering the technology industry. They also share their thoughts on possible social solutions and products that can be developed if women are encouraged to pursue careers in technology.

    gg


    ff

    Comments: Comments (0)

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